How I can I find the full text of a journal article?

When you search for journal articles on many of our resources, the results which you find fall into the following 2 categories:

  1. results that will let you click through and open up the whole journal article (a.k.a. the ‘full text’)
  2. results that do not let you open up the whole journal article, but instead just provide you with information about the article (e.g. who the author is; which journal it was published in; the abstract) (Bonus library jargon: the technical library term for this is the bibliographic information.)
    —> (Read our sister post: ‘What is the point in journal articles that I can’t read?’)

You may want to only see the results where you can read the whole journal article (& not see the results where you can’t.)  You can do this in the following ways:

Library catalogue > journal articles

  • Go to the library catalogue and select the journal articles option (here) catalogue_journal-articles
  • Search for journal articles on a topic
  • On the results page select ‘Full Text Online’full-text-online
  • The page will refresh and you will now only see results that let you open up & read the whole journal article

Full Text Finder

  • Go to Full Text Finder (the link is found on the library intranet homepage > in the text in the middle of the page) and select ‘New Search’ (found in the top left corner)
  • Search for journal articles on a topic
  •  On the results page make sure that the box ‘Limit To: Full Text’ is tickedfull-text-finder
  • Once this box is ticked you will only see results that let you open up and read the whole journal article

Other databases

This principle can be applied to other databases as well, although the steps may look slightly different.  Essentially, look for a way to narrow down your results so that you only see ‘Full Text’ or results which you can ‘Read / Read and Download’.

If you have any questions please contact the Library Enquiries Desk or your Subject Librarian.

Read our sister post: ‘What is the point in journal articles that I can’t read?’

 

 

 

(Featured image by Dmitry Ratushny, licenced for re-use under CC 0)

 

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